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2014

September

New research from Arizona State University and the University of Tokyo that analyzes transmission rates of Ebola in West African countries shows how rapidly the disease is spreading.

August

Editor's Note: Growing up, ASU student Erin Barton and her brother often accompanied their archaeologist parents on research excursions.

West Africa is being ravaged by the largest ever outbreak of Ebola, a disease with a death rate of up to 90 percent.

July

Keeping kids healthy is Jason Gillette’s business.

The influence of friends seems stronger in prompting adolescents to start smoking than in urging them to quit.

As a college student studying anthropology, Michael Barton wanted to understand how people as a society impact the environment, and how the environment impacts society.

Late last month, an isolated Amazon tribe finally made contact with a team of Brazilian scientists after being sighted by area villagers for weeks.

Christopher Morehart is an academic who thinks outside the box.

June

In the last 15 years, around seven million Brazilians have been sickened by the mosquito-borne virus known as dengue, or breakbone, fever.

Urban anthropologist Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman is passionate about people and public spaces – and bringing them together.

Southeast Asia is about as far as one can get – geographically and culturally – from Iceland, where Hjorleifur Jonsson was born and raised.

May

The character and history of Chicago’s South Shore neighborhood are at the core of a recent Boston Globe article by Carlo Rotella, author and director of American studies at Boston College.

Arizona State University anthropologist Casandra Hernandez has been named one of Phoenix New Times’ 1

The achievements of Arizona State University archaeologist Geoffrey Clark were lauded at a symposium this April at the 79th annual meeting of the Society for American

“When you have life experiences where you are often treated differently because of some aspect of your identity, a place where you are treated equal to everyone else – and that treatment is positiv

Heat killed 139 people in Arizona in 2013. The best way to reduce that number is to be prepared.

Who will suffer most if things go wrong with nuclear power? Dean Kyne answers the question with a first-of-its-kind dissertation on nuclear risks from an environmental justice perspective.

Born in the outskirts of Havana City, Cuba, Oscar Patterson-Lomba came to the United States with the goal of becoming a scientist whose work changes people’s lives for the better.

April

Arizona State University announced today that the Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will be renamed as the Simon A.

Arizona State University alumnus Matthew Peeples has earned the 2014 Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) Dissertation Award.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has launched a new initiative designed to reward outstanding doctoral and masters students recognized nationally or internationally during academic year 201

Arizona State University bioarchaeologist Jane Buikstra will be named an honorary doctor of science at Durham University this summer.

Earlier this month, a group of Arizona State University undergraduate students traveled to Washington, D.C., as part of Capitol Hill Days.

Over millennia, the Sahara has gone through cycles of greening and aridity.

Undergraduate research opportunities abound at Arizona State University, and archaeologist Michael E. Smith is one of the top faculty for providing them.

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