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2019

Judging others is a very human behavior. Stigma — treating people with specific traits as unwanted within society — is a particularly harmful manifestation of that.

Between 1910 and 1970, the African American population of Arizona grew from 2,000 to over 54,000, according to a new exhibit on display at Arizona State University’s School of Human Evolution and S

Every semester, when thousands of students move their graduation cap tassels from right to left, it doesn’t mean education has ended for them.

If you’re Italian, you don’t miss Mama’s “red lead” on Sunday night.

Human behavior over time has been extraordinarily complex; that's partly why so many different fields exist to study it.

Cooperative behaviors, which differ from one country to another, from one community to another, can make the world an interesting — though sometimes challenging place — to live.

Were archaeology to be defined solely by the movies, you’d assume it involves traveling to exotic lands and stealing ancient relics.

Sac Balam was a Lacandon Maya city founded over four centuries ago. It was both a sanctuary and place of resistance during the time of Spanish colonial rule.

Is there a norm when it comes to how long a mom breastfeeds her baby?

First-year student Ashley Stills is on a mission to serve mothers and their newborns in local and international communities.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the largest and most diverse academic unit at Arizona State University.

Undergraduate global health student Mariyah Dreza spent her summer researching mental health in Guatemala and along the way had the opportunity to speak to an audience of local undergraduate studen

When diagnosing and treating illnesses, traditional medicine looks to the ailment itself. But what about the biological, environmental and evolutionary factors that paved its way?

A controversial new study based on observation in the wild proposes that gorillas have hierarchical social structures and form something like friendships.

Tamales, churros, raspados, elotes. On the streets of Los Angeles, the hands that serve these dishes from the shade of a vending cart may belong to a child with a special family role.

School of Human Evolution and Social Change alumna Sara Becker has one particularly clear memory from her undergraduate years at Arizona State University: the time she nearly ran over Donald Johans

When an earthquake or a tsunami strikes, aid groups and rescue teams begin assessing emergency needs right away. But other crises are harder to quantify.

It’s hard to imagine what the world looked like millions of years ago. But in Arizona, a journey through the Grand Canyon on the Colorado River gives a sense of how it might have felt. 

During World War II, the U.S. government forced around 120,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast out of their homes and into 10 different family incarceration centers.

In 1899, when Arizona had not yet gained statehood and Arizona State University was a fledgling institution known as the Tempe Normal School, Zebulon Pearce was freshly graduated with teachers cred

Early members of our genus Homo have been making tools for 10,000 years longer than we thought.

Two groundbreaking DNA studies give fresh clues about the ancestry of North American peoples and ancient groups’ migrations across Beringia.

Women get autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, eight times more than men do.

A new archaeological site discovered by an international and local team of scientists — including ASU researchers — working in Ethiopia shows that the origins of stone tool production are older tha

Some students major in the humanities; others take a humanities class just to check off a general credit.

The unseasonably temperate weather in the Phoenix metropolitan area this spring may have everyone scratching their heads, but rest assured, heat will always be a concern in the Valley whose name pa

Two Arizona State University professors have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

A mammal’s posture while moving, or locomotor posture, plays a key role in how variable the number of vertebrae in its spinal column can be across all members of that species, a team of researchers

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