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2018

November

Five Arizona State University faculty members have been named President’s Professors, an honor that recognizes faculty who have made substantial contributions to undergraduate education.

There is a problem with the set of tools social scientists use to study human behavior.

October

Imagine a renaissance city where revolutionary ideas in urban planning, politics, economy, ecology and the arts all arose at the same time, creating a high standard of living that was largely equit

Most archaeological fieldwork in the U.S. is federally mandated for historic preservation.

In the Maya city of Copán lies a crypt holding the remains of 16 jaguars and pumas.

Why and when did humans begin to rely on culturally transmitted information? Does culture allow humans to adapt to a wide range of ecological habitats?

Understanding the relationship between Earth history and human evolution is an enduring challenge of broad scientific and public interest.

Amy Jacobson, an Arizona State University alumna and evolutionary anthropologist, is taking to the big screen this month in a feature film about climate change, energy and the future of humanity na

September

Think about where you are right now. Your office chair, your living room couch, your spot of shady sidewalk. The land under your feet has a story to tell.

There are scores of saccharine quotes about friendship floating around — “Friends are the relatives we choose,” for example. (Really, the only one that resonates is “Friends help you move.

August

The bonds between Arizona State University and its partners in Mexico over the past few years are producing large-scale research that will help millions of people as well as small projects to assis

Born in Tucson, Arizona, but raised in the East Valley, Holly Celaya grew up a dedicated University of Arizona fan.

The last few weeks of summer are a prime time to hit the road and enjoy the wilderness, whether it’s hiking, biking, rafting or camping.

Since Darwin first laid out the basic principles of evolution by means of natural selection, the role of competition for food as a driving force in shaping and shifting a species’ biology to outcom

In the Iron Age stone tower of Cairns Broch in Orkney, Scotland, archaeologists found a 2000-year-old wooden bowl, along with 20 perfectly preserved strands of human hair.

July

How did small, isolated groups of ancient humans come to form complex societies?

According to a recent study, highlighted by Melissa Healy for the Los Angeles Times, g

A new study on ancient cultures in Peru has found the most effective growth strategy for leaders of some early city-states was

Scientists were astounded to discover white-faced capuchins using stone tools to crack open nuts and shellfish on a Panamanian island.

June

An international team of researchers, including Alejandra Ortiz, a postdoctoral researcher with Arizona State University

It’s a disclaimer that echoes passionately through the lecture halls of every beginning archaeology course: It’s not like the Indiana Jones movies!

Keith Kintigh has seen the future of archaeology — and it’s not what you might expect.

More than one-third of American adults and roughly 17 percent of children in the U.S.

May

The California clapper rail is a chicken-sized bird with slender legs, brown feathers and a long beak. It makes its home in the salt marshes of the San Francisco Bay.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

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