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2020

An Arizona State University anthropologist and his colleagues are helping an indigenous group in Bolivia understand and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with medical researchers in the efforts to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus, social scientists are taking the pulse of society and examining underlying c

It’s Friday morning, and Arizona State University students Daniela Ledesma and Hanna Maroofi head to the Arizona Department of Health Services in downtown Phoenix.

Archaeological sites on the far southern shores of South Africa hold the world’s richest records for the behavioral and cultural origins of our species.

Every year Arizona State University Faculty Women’s Association recognizes exceptional mentors across the university with the Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award.

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of no

Experts are warning that the coronavirus outbreak could devastate remote indigenous communities around the world.

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable

It has become increasingly clear that, depending on the computer model used, either we could still be in the midst of the pandemic with rising numbers of cases and deaths or we could be nearing the

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable

Social distancing is flattening the curve of coronavirus in Arizona, according to a team of Arizona State University experts, but they expect the disease to spread if restrictions are lifted.

On Monday, May 11, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social scien

Humans willingly incur costs to punish selfishness in others, and our societies are likely more cooperative as a result.

Christopher Stojanowski, a bioarchaeologist who uses the tools of skeletal biology to investigate human history, has been named director of Ariz

If you’ve spent time in national parks or state recreational areas, you’ve likely seen warnings about the spread of invasive species.

An international team including ASU researcher Gary Schwartz, has unearthed the earliest known skull of Homo erectus, the first of o

Scientists have long been able to measure and analyze the fossil skulls of our ancient ancestors to estimate brain volume and growth.

The Network for Computational Modeling in Social and Ecological Sciences (CoMSES Net), which acts as an international clearinghouse for computer models and a place where modelers can share their wo

In Pondoland, on the east coast of South Africa, Erich Fisher, an Institute of Human Origins research scient

There’s just something about a good, old-fashioned family drama that never fails to captivate an audience.

It may not always seem so, but scientists are convinced that humans are unusually cooperative.

Dental plaque — the stuff that your hygienist is always scraping off your teeth — holds a treasure trove of your DNA and, if not cleaned off occasionally, will build up and remain on your teeth lon

2019

Research on global biodiversity has long assumed that present-day biodiversity patterns reflect present-day factors, namely contemporary climate and human activities.

Seven outstanding faculty from Arizona State University have been named as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

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