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2018

September

Think about where you are right now. Your office chair, your living room couch, your spot of shady sidewalk. The land under your feet has a story to tell.

There are scores of saccharine quotes about friendship floating around — “Friends are the relatives we choose,” for example. (Really, the only one that resonates is “Friends help you move.

August

The bonds between Arizona State University and its partners in Mexico over the past few years are producing large-scale research that will help millions of people as well as small projects to assis

Born in Tucson, Arizona, but raised in the East Valley, Holly Celaya grew up a dedicated University of Arizona fan.

The last few weeks of summer are a prime time to hit the road and enjoy the wilderness, whether it’s hiking, biking, rafting or camping.

Since Darwin first laid out the basic principles of evolution by means of natural selection, the role of competition for food as a driving force in shaping and shifting a species’ biology to outcom

In the Iron Age stone tower of Cairns Broch in Orkney, Scotland, archaeologists found a 2000-year-old wooden bowl, along with 20 perfectly preserved strands of human hair.

July

How did small, isolated groups of ancient humans come to form complex societies?

According to a recent study, highlighted by Melissa Healy for the Los Angeles Times, g

A new study on ancient cultures in Peru has found the most effective growth strategy for leaders of some early city-states was

Scientists were astounded to discover white-faced capuchins using stone tools to crack open nuts and shellfish on a Panamanian island.

June

An international team of researchers, including Alejandra Ortiz, a postdoctoral researcher with Arizona State University

It’s a disclaimer that echoes passionately through the lecture halls of every beginning archaeology course: It’s not like the Indiana Jones movies!

More than one-third of American adults and roughly 17 percent of children in the U.S.

Keith Kintigh has seen the future of archaeology — and it’s not what you might expect.

May

The California clapper rail is a chicken-sized bird with slender legs, brown feathers and a long beak. It makes its home in the salt marshes of the San Francisco Bay.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

April

Nik Dave has worked in Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute since he was a sophomore in high school.

DNA — since the world first saw its iconic double helix structure in 1953, it has given scientists a treasure trove of insights into human health and uniqueness.

The first national Saber es Poder-IME Award will be awarded on April 28 to Arizona

All over the world, archaeologists are constantly collecting data.

Across the world of mammals, teeth come in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

On Tuesday, May 8, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, natural sciences and humanities

March

On one of the most memorable days of her life, Kaye Reed found herself holding the jawbone of an ancestor who lived 2.8 million years ago.

In early March, the Center for Global Health in ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change hosted this year’s Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) international conference, with participa

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