News

2021

Of all the creatures on Earth, humans manipulate their environments the most. But, how far can we push it before something drastic happens?

Arizona State University researchers will help lead a $1.2 million, multi-institution project that will use a new theoretical framework and state-of-the-art technology to tackle a long-standing que

During the Baroque era, Peter Paul Rubens painted lush figures. In Imperial China, a plus-size woman was a classic beauty by the standards of the time. In Gilded Age America, tycoons like J.P.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University offers a variety of courses on gender and sexuality as well as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ)

Arizona State University’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change has launched a new master’s degree to give students an international and interdisciplinar

Like discovering fire or creating stone tools, transitioning from hunter-gatherer to farmer was a defining change for humans.

Amid the many challenges of the pandemic, student workers at ASU’s Knowledge Exchange for Resilience (KER) collaborated to drive use-inspired researc

The modern, industrialized society is not how humans have always lived.

In fact, the last 200 years make up only a tiny portion of human history.

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

You may know someone who has undergone bariatric surgery — an intense medical procedure that reduces the size of a person’s stomach to help with rapid weight loss.

On Monday, May 3, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, natural sciences and humanities divisi

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of 

A new study by researchers, including Arizona State University graduate student Maryse Biernat, verifies the age of one of the oldest specimens

The ASU Graduate College has announced the awardees of the fifth annual Graduate College Knowledge Mobilization Awards.

Modern humans are the world’s apex predator. For tens of thousands of years, deep into the Stone Age, humans hunted and killed the largest animals on land and sea. How?

Thirty years ago, clinical psychiatrist Jonathan Shay drew attention to similarities between the trauma experienced by Greek warriors, as documented in the epic poem “The Iliad,” and Vietnam vetera

While guidelines from the World Health Organization call for frequent handwashing, physical distancing and proper sanitation to limit the spread of COVID-19, a recent analysis shows how water

One of the world’s foremost experts in paleoanthropology, Yohannes Haile-Selassie, known for major fossil discoveries in the African Rift Valley and extensive scholarship in human origins science,

In a battle between a boar and a bobcat, who would win? What about between a group of Neandertals and a giant short-faced bear?

It’s the year 1500. A buyer and a seller are haggling in the massive Aztec marketplace of Tlatelolco, over chiles, cacao beans or copal incense perhaps. It’s getting heated.

Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change marked World Anthropology Day earlier this month, hosting a celebration on social media and a virtual movie night. 

In the last 60,000 years, humans have emerged as an ecologically dominant species and have successfully colonized every terrestrial habitat.

Humans are unusual because we cooperate with each other in ways that other animals do not.

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