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2018

May

The California clapper rail is a chicken-sized bird with slender legs, brown feathers and a long beak. It makes its home in the salt marshes of the San Francisco Bay.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

April

Nik Dave has worked in Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute since he was a sophomore in high school.

DNA — since the world first saw its iconic double helix structure in 1953, it has given scientists a treasure trove of insights into human health and uniqueness.

The first national Saber es Poder-IME Award will be awarded on April 28 to Arizona

All over the world, archaeologists are constantly collecting data.

Across the world of mammals, teeth come in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

On Tuesday, May 8, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, natural sciences and humanities

March

On one of the most memorable days of her life, Kaye Reed found herself holding the jawbone of an ancestor who lived 2.8 million years ago.

In early March, the Center for Global Health in ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change hosted this year’s Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) international conference, with participa

Arizona has a rich historical legacy, and there’s no better time to appreciate it than in March, when temperate weather combines with opportunity for adventure during Arizona Archaeology and Herita

In the 1960s, an archaeologist named René Millon began mapping the ancient city of Teotihuacan in Mexico.

Imagine a year in Africa when summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter.

From stately cruise ships to Olympic host cities, recent headline-grabbing outbreaks prove that norovirus — an incapacitating and vaccine-less stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhea — can st

February

“A society is defined not only by what it creates, but what it refuses to destroy,” environmentalist John Sawhill said.

A 2,000-year-old handprint changed the course of Kelly Knudson’s life.

What makes humans special? It's a question mankind has puzzled over for centuries.

Archaeologists are seeing the Maya culture in a whole new light thanks to an emerging technology that has identified countless new buildings that had been hidden for centuries.

Are you in need of some fitness alignment in your mateship? Do you see potential pair bonding in your future? Or are you just looking for good, old-fashioned love?

Arizona State University researcher Kevin Langergraber knows nearly 200 chimpanzees of the Ngogo community by sight and by name — Jackso

January

Women around the world have been excluded from many professions throughout history, including, until recently, city planning and management.

Have you ever felt a deep, instant bond with a city? A place where the people, culture and even the architecture all seem to whisper, “This is where you belong”?

2017

December

Arizona State University ranks ninth out of 719 universities in the U.S.

On Tuesday, Dec.12, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, n

November

Five graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowsh

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