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2019

Early members of our genus Homo have been making tools for 10,000 years longer than we thought.

Two groundbreaking DNA studies give fresh clues about the ancestry of North American peoples and ancient groups’ migrations across Beringia.

Women get autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, eight times more than men do.

A new archaeological site discovered by an international and local team of scientists — including ASU researchers — working in Ethiopia shows that the origins of stone tool production are older tha

Some students major in the humanities; others take a humanities class just to check off a general credit.

The unseasonably temperate weather in the Phoenix metropolitan area this spring may have everyone scratching their heads, but rest assured, heat will always be a concern in the Valley whose name pa

Two Arizona State University professors have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

A mammal’s posture while moving, or locomotor posture, plays a key role in how variable the number of vertebrae in its spinal column can be across all members of that species, a team of researchers

One in four adults in the U.S.

Each spring, high school students across the U.S. declare their college decisions, a first major step in carving their future path, and it deserves celebration.

We know that our DNA can tell us a lot about ourselves, from susceptibility to certain cancer types to biological relationships.

Cindi SturtzSreetharan was driving her daughter home from school when her daughter asked, “Do you think my thighs look fat?” The child was 9 years old.

This Tuesday, April 23, marks the inaugural Arizona State University Undergraduate Research P

Dragonglass is a valuable material in the “Game of Thrones” franchise — but its real-world counterpart, obsidian, has been prized, gathered and traded by humans for thousands of years.

Studying online takes more than a laptop and a comfortable desk chair.

Scientists have found the remains of what they believe to be a new species of ancient hominin, Homo luzonensis, on the Philippine island Luzon.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2019 commen

On Tuesday, May 7, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students fro

The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat

On Tuesday, May 7, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students fro

Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 1777. At the end of a daylong battle, George Washington’s right flank has completely collapsed. British troops are closing in. 

Beginning about 60,000 years ago, our species spread across the world occupying a wider range of habitats than any other species.

“Fifty-eight Holes” is an ancient board game that, like today’s Snakes and Ladders or Candyland, pits opponents in a race to the finish.

Sustainability shouldn’t only be taught within the walls of universities. It should also be an integral part of kindergarten through high school (K–12) curriculum.

The study of the remains of ancient people with rare diseases is revealing surprising insights into societies of the past.

Have you heard the one about the aliens and the pyramids? Or what about the technologically advanced but tragically lost city of Atlantis?

Compared with other animals, chimpanzees show tremendous variation across groups in their behavior — from the types of tools they use in their feeding behavior to the specific gestures they use in

Did the Black Plague that besieged medieval Europe also creep south to devastate sub-Saharan Africa?

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