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2018

On Tuesday, May 8, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, natural sciences and humanities

On one of the most memorable days of her life, Kaye Reed found herself holding the jawbone of an ancestor who lived 2.8 million years ago.

In early March, the Center for Global Health in ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change hosted this year’s Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) international conference, with participa

Arizona has a rich historical legacy, and there’s no better time to appreciate it than in March, when temperate weather combines with opportunity for adventure during Arizona Archaeology and Herita

In the 1960s, an archaeologist named René Millon began mapping the ancient city of Teotihuacan in Mexico.

Imagine a year in Africa when summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter.

From stately cruise ships to Olympic host cities, recent headline-grabbing outbreaks prove that norovirus — an incapacitating and vaccine-less stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhea — can st

“A society is defined not only by what it creates, but what it refuses to destroy,” environmentalist John Sawhill said.

A 2,000-year-old handprint changed the course of Kelly Knudson’s life.

What makes humans special? It's a question mankind has puzzled over for centuries.

Archaeologists are seeing the Maya culture in a whole new light thanks to an emerging technology that has identified countless new buildings that had been hidden for centuries.

Are you in need of some fitness alignment in your mateship? Do you see potential pair bonding in your future? Or are you just looking for good, old-fashioned love?

Arizona State University researcher Kevin Langergraber knows nearly 200 chimpanzees of the Ngogo community by sight and by name — Jackso

Women around the world have been excluded from many professions throughout history, including, until recently, city planning and management.

Have you ever felt a deep, instant bond with a city? A place where the people, culture and even the architecture all seem to whisper, “This is where you belong”?

2017

Arizona State University ranks ninth out of 719 universities in the U.S.

On Tuesday, Dec.12, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, n

Five graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowsh

“Can I borrow a cup of sugar?” For many Americans, the question conjures a nostalgic image of friendly neighbors relying on each other for support and assistance.

Out on the far northwestern edge of the Valley, where the pavement turns to sand, is a place people have been visiting for 5,000 years.

Teotihuacan was once the largest and most influential city in the ancient new world. Yet its social structure seems to be more egalitarian than those in its fellow ancient cities.

Thanksgiving time finds many of us thinking back to our fondest food memories. But what if the meal that sticks out most in your mind doesn’t feature a turkey and pumpkin pie?

Seven members of Arizona State University are among the 396 newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a prestigious international scientific soc

Sports are embedded in college tradition, and no other time reminds us of this quite like Homecoming. But what do sports look like in other cultures?

Three Arizona State University professors were honored at the Victoria Foundation’s eighth annual Arizona Higher Education Awards ceremony for helping Latina/o youth pursue advanced degrees.

It’s official: Anthropology has gone high tech.

ASU senior Monet Niesluchowski gave Phileas Fogg, the protagonist of Jules Verne’s classic adventure novel “Around the World in Eighty Days,” a run for his money this summer when she traveled to Ic

Air travel may be the quickest way to get to your vacation destination, but it’s also one of the speediest ways for infectious diseases to spread between people, cities and countries.

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