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2019

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2019 commen

Studying online takes more than a laptop and a comfortable desk chair.

On Tuesday, May 7, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students fro

On Tuesday, May 7, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students fro

The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat

Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 1777. At the end of a daylong battle, George Washington’s right flank has completely collapsed. British troops are closing in. 

Beginning about 60,000 years ago, our species spread across the world occupying a wider range of habitats than any other species.

“Fifty-eight Holes” is an ancient board game that, like today’s Snakes and Ladders or Candyland, pits opponents in a race to the finish.

Sustainability shouldn’t only be taught within the walls of universities. It should also be an integral part of kindergarten through high school (K–12) curriculum.

The study of the remains of ancient people with rare diseases is revealing surprising insights into societies of the past.

Have you heard the one about the aliens and the pyramids? Or what about the technologically advanced but tragically lost city of Atlantis?

Did the Black Plague that besieged medieval Europe also creep south to devastate sub-Saharan Africa?

Compared with other animals, chimpanzees show tremendous variation across groups in their behavior — from the types of tools they use in their feeding behavior to the specific gestures they use in

The FBI recently discovered around 2,000 human bones in the home of an artifacts collector from Indiana. Most are believed to be from Native American burial sites.

Frank McManamon is an archaeologist who has devoted his career to guiding policy in a way that balances concerns about sensitive tribal cultural resources and the public benefits of historical and

Growing up in East Los Angeles, Erika Camacho, an associate professor in the 

An English master’s student, a business sophomore and an urban planning undergrad walk into a classroom. There is no punchline here, and they are all in the right place.

“A lot of students think we’re just going to talk about art and aesthetics, but I challenge them to think about the cultural importance of art.

Tucked away somewhere, in the annals of many a university’s research archives, are the theses of the students of yesteryear.

Valentine’s Day is upon us, and that means chocolate.

Before becoming the first trained anthropologist to helm the American Anthropological Association, Ed Liebow got his start at Arizona State University’

For those who study humanity, it’s tough to get the big picture if they limit themselves to the culture, history and environment of just one place.

Fitness goals are typically at the forefront of New Year’s resolutions for many Americans.

Excavations in Mexico recently unearthed the first known temple dedicated to Xipe Totec, a god of the ancient Popoloca people who was associated with fertility and regeneration.

The work of ASU archaeologists has been in the spotlight thanks to the Phoenix Art Museum’s current exhibition "Teotihuacan: City of Water, Ci

Anxious mothers may pass the stress hormone cortisol on to their babies through breast milk — but how does it affect infant development?

Tucked away in a quiet corner of Arizona State University's Tempe campus, the Archaeological Chemistry Laboratory analyzes samples from across the globe — such as plants, bones, dirt, textiles and

2018

Researchers recently announced the discovery of a previously unknown, ancient strain of the plague, which they found in the bones of a Swedish woman who was buried 5,000 years ago.

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