News

2011

A group of Arizona State University students recently participated in a two-week study abroad program in Dubai.

There’s a common misconception that prior to European contact in the 15th century, the Americas were a pristine, untouched wilderness, inhabited by people who lived in complete harmony with their e

As a child, Andrea Feiler’s favorite toys were her microscope and telescope. She dreamed of becoming a scientist.

Holly Craw of the Phoenix Homeschooling Examiner is touting Arizona State University’s Deer Valley Rock Art Center as an important destination for home-school families and supporters.

2010

January is the perfect time in Arizona to get out and see the sights – and at the Deer Valley Rock Art Center, the sights include petroglyphs.

Some of Arizona’s greatest cultural resources are not easy to find, yet when vandals discover them, tragedy can occur.

Francis P. McManamon has spent decades protecting and promoting North America’s archaeological legacy.

When Afton Chavez took her first college chemistry class, she discovered a passion for science and a desire to enter the field of medicine.

Remote sensing has been integral to the field of archaeology for many years, but Arizona State University archaeologist Stephen H.

Arizona State University archaeologist David Abbott has been selected to receive this year’s Arizona Archaeological Council Award for Contributions to Arizona Archaeology.

Scientists and policymakers both contend that investments in nanoscale science and engineering will create revolutions in areas as diverse as materials, drug delivery, cancer treatment, and space t

After 15 years of wear and tear from Mother Nature and tens of thousands of curious visitors, the Deer Valley Rock Art Center is getting a much-needed facelift.

Partible paternity – the belief that multiple men can be co-genitors of a single child – is the subject of a study by University of Missouri anthropologists Robert Walker and Mark Flinn and Arizona

ASU’s Museum of Anthropology has a new exhibit, "Return of the Corn Mothers" that focuses on women who have earned accolades for community activism and creative endeavors.

For the last 10 years, the Arizona State University Museum of Anthropology has presented an annual Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) exhibition that has broug

Arizona State University anthropology graduate student Catherine Nichols spent her summer on the hunt in the archives of the Smithsonian Institution. Her investigative work is just beginning.

This month, President Obama announced his intent to nominate mathematical epidemiologist Carlos Castillo-Chavez, an Arizona State University professor, to the President’s Committee on the Nat

Sustainability expert Johan Rockström, executive director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, recently told a TED Talks audience that “incremental change is not an option” when it comes to protecti

Almost 20 years after his discovery, Oetzi (Ötzi) the Iceman is a step closer to making his identity known.

Interested in learning about our human past while enjoying the vibrant Downtown Phoenix area?

The urban poor – already a vulnerable population – are the most susceptible to extreme heat.

For five years, Arizona State University archaeologist Michael E.

Computer modeling is broadening the scope of archaeology by not only providing a better understanding of the past but also by predicting what might occur in the future.

Arizona State University alumna Christine Lee has been selected as one of National Geographic’s 2010 Emerging Explorers for her bioarchaeological work investigating the mysteries of ancient China’s

When Howard Carter unearthed King Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, the world was introduced to a fantastical cache of ancient Egyptian artifacts and the mummy of a young royal who died, mysteriously, at

A role-playing game that uses multiple colors and squares to represent different landscapes has been developed by researchers to study the forced human migration of farmers to a remote Amazon jungl

Computational modeling techniques provide new and vast opportunities to the field of archaeology.

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