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2018

January

Have you ever felt a deep, instant bond with a city? A place where the people, culture and even the architecture all seem to whisper, “This is where you belong”?

2017

December

Arizona State University ranks ninth out of 719 universities in the U.S.

On Tuesday, Dec.12, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest achieving students from the social sciences, n

November

Five graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University received the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowsh

Out on the far northwestern edge of the Valley, where the pavement turns to sand, is a place people have been visiting for 5,000 years.

“Can I borrow a cup of sugar?” For many Americans, the question conjures a nostalgic image of friendly neighbors relying on each other for support and assistance.

Teotihuacan was once the largest and most influential city in the ancient new world. Yet its social structure seems to be more egalitarian than those in its fellow ancient cities.

Thanksgiving time finds many of us thinking back to our fondest food memories. But what if the meal that sticks out most in your mind doesn’t feature a turkey and pumpkin pie?

Seven members of Arizona State University are among the 396 newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a prestigious international scientific soc

October

Sports are embedded in college tradition, and no other time reminds us of this quite like Homecoming. But what do sports look like in other cultures?

September

Three Arizona State University professors were honored at the Victoria Foundation’s eighth annual Arizona Higher Education Awards ceremony for helping Latina/o youth pursue advanced degrees.

It’s official: Anthropology has gone high tech.

ASU senior Monet Niesluchowski gave Phileas Fogg, the protagonist of Jules Verne’s classic adventure novel “Around the World in Eighty Days,” a run for his money this summer when she traveled to Ic

August

Air travel may be the quickest way to get to your vacation destination, but it’s also one of the speediest ways for infectious diseases to spread between people, cities and countries.

July

Imagine you’re on a 28-mile journey that takes you across icy rivers and up steep jungle trails.

June

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University welcomes five new administrators into leadership ranks.

Bioarchaeology is a young but quickly growing field that studies how people from the past lived and died, and is most often described as a combination of biological anthropology, archaeology and so

Planets get all the attention — just look at the ruckus raised when Pluto was demoted or anytime NASA announces exoplanet discoveries.

When male chimpanzees of the world’s largest known troop patrol the boundaries of their territory in Ngogo, Uganda, they walk silently in single file.

May

Arizona State University researchers have contributed to a study that offers the first comprehensive assessment of what was going on in the world when the genus that includes modern humans first ev

As a way to highlight student achievement and inspire future outreach, Arizona State University's ASASU Council of Presidents sponsored the first-ever Students Shine contest this spring. 

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2017 commencement.

Zalabiyya is a dish of fried dough pieces served with sugar or honey. In Sudan, it’s a common offering at afternoon tea, and Brenda Baker goes to tea in Sudan a lot.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2017 commencement.

April

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2017 commencement.

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