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Sustainability of Marine Renewable Resources in Subarctic Systems Under Incumbent Environmental Variability and Human Exploitation

Cleaning fish on the dock

The portion of this project conducted at Arizona State University will focus on integrating research activities by developing a conceptual socio-ecological framework to address the implications for sustainability of current and alternative policy practices and scientific knowledge gaps.

The portion of this project conducted at Arizona State University will focus on integrating research activities by developing a conceptual socio-ecological framework to address the implications for sustainability of current and alternative policy practices and scientific knowledge gaps.

Specifically, project members at ASU will extend the social-ecological systems (SES) framework developed by Nobel laureate Elinor Ostrom and colleagues and the Robustness of SES framework developed by J. Marty Anderies and colleagues to merge basic eco-evolutionary, oceanographic and socio-economic principles in a conceptual framework that can address the socio-ecological implications of current and alternative policy practices in large marine ecosystems, under incumbent climate variability and human exploitation.

ASU researchers will use data from the case studies to characterize fishery social-ecological systems using variables defined in the above-mentioned frameworks. These characterizations will be used to build dynamic models to explore the implications of current and alternative policy practices for the sustainability of marine renewable resources in subarctic systems under incumbent environmental variability and human exploitation.

 

Funding Source:
Oregon State University (Prime Sponsor: National Science Foundation) 

Team Members:

Lorenzo Ciannelli, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
Colleen Webb, Colorado State University Department of Biology
J. Marty Anderies, Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change
David Yu, Arizona State University School of Sustainability
Kevin Bailey, Alaska Fisheries Science Center