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Preventing Childbirth Emergencies in Resource-Scarce Settings

Newborn baby

This project studies how women and their caregivers identify complications during childbirth and decide to seek skilled care. In future phases, the project will examine how such local theories interact with economic and structural barriers to influence care-seeking trajectories.

In ongoing collaboration with researchers at Emory University and with NGOs in Bangladesh, this project studies how women and their caregivers identify complications during childbirth and decide to seek skilled care. The broader aim is to reduce critical delays in care during childbirth emergencies, including postpartum hemorrhage, prolonged labor and birth asphyxia. The project has focused on local theories for the causes of such childbirth complications and how these influence care-seeking. In future phases, the project will examine how such local theories interact with economic and structural barriers to influence care-seeking trajectories.

Publications: 
Hruschka, D. J., Sibley, L. M., Kalim, N. & Edmonds, J. K. (2008). When there is more than one answer key: Cultural theories of postpartum hemorrhage in Matlab, Bangladesh. Field Methods, 20(4), 315-27.

Sibley L. M., Hruschka, D. J., Kalim, N., Khan, J., Paul, M., Edmonds, J. K. & Koblinsky, M. A. (2009). Cultural theories of postpartum bleeding Matlab, Bangladesh: Implications for community health intervention. Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition.

Sibley, L. M., Blum, L. S., Kalim, N., Hruschka, D. J., Edmonds, J. K. & Koblinsky, M. (2007). Women’s descriptions of postpartum health problems: Preliminary findings from Matlab, Bangladesh. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health, 52(4), 351-60.

Edmonds, J. K., Hruschka, D. J., Sibley, L. M. (in press). A comparison of excessive postpartum blood loss estimates among three subgroups of women attending births in Matlab, Bangladesh. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health.

Daniel Hruschka, Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change