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Neuromuscularly Controlled In Vivo Canine Larynx: A New Experimental Platform to Study Neurogenic Voice Disorders

Illustration of doctor checking patient's throat

The long-term goal of this collaborative ASU-Mayo Clinic project is to develop new techniques of functional electrical stimulation to accurately and reproducibly control the state of all the intrinsic laryngeal muscles involved in producing voice. 

The long-term goal of this collaborative ASU-Mayo Clinic project is to develop new techniques of functional electrical stimulation to accurately and reproducibly control the state of all the intrinsic laryngeal muscles involved in producing voice. First, a neuromuscularly controlled in vivo canine model will be constructed where first-generation extra-neural cuff electrodes will interface with the laryngeal nerves. Then, new electrode designs and electrical stimulation paradigms will be developed for advanced diagnosis and rehabilitation of neurogenic voice disorders. As a first application, this experimental platform will be used to better understand the neurogenic voice disorder vocal tremor.

Juergen Neubauer, Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change
David G. Lott, Mayo Clinic Arizona Head and Neck Regeneration Laboratory
Rosemary A. Lester, Mayo Clinic Arizona Head and Neck Regeneration Laboratory