Emir Estrada

Office: 
SHESC
268
Assistant Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
2402
Asst Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
2402
Asst Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
2402

Biography

Emir Estrada earned her doctorate and master's in sociology from the University of Southern California (USC) in 2012. She received her bachelor's in sociology with a minor in Chicano/a Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and she is also a proud Long Beach City College (LBCC) alumni. Estrada is a qualitative immigration scholar interested in the migration an incorporation aspect of immigrants from Latin America. Her research interests in immigration and gender are influenced in great part by her own immigration experience. She is currently investigating three lines of research that share a common theme centered on Latina/o families and decision making processes.

Estrada is also an affiliated faculty member with the School of Transborder Studies (STS) and the School of Social Transformation (SST) in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at ASU.   

Education

  • Ph.D. Sociology, University of Southern California (USC) 2012
  • M.A. Sociology, University of Southern California (USC) 2010
  • B. A. Sociology and Chicana/o Studies,  (UCLA) 2005
  • A.A. Liberal Arts, Long Beach City College (LBCC) 2003

Google Scholar

Research Interests

International migration, Latino Sociology, Childhood, The Ethnic Economy, Street Vending, Family Work Relations,

Publications

BOOK

Estrada, Emir. (Forthcoming 2018). Working with La Familia: Latina/o Street Vending Children Working, Playing, and Learning in the U.S. (Under Advanced Contract with NYU. Full Manuscript Under Review)

 

SELECTED PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

 

Estrada, Emir. 2017. Creating Safe Spaces: Strategies and unintentional consequences of Latina street vendors in Los Angeles. Internacionales. 3(5): 168-193.

Estrada, Emir. 2016. "Economic Empathy in Family Entrepreneurship: Mexican-Origin Street Vendor Children and their Parents.” Ethnic and Racial Studies. 39(9) 1657-1675.

Estrada, Emir. 2013 “Changing Household Dynamics: Children’s American Generational Resources in Street Vending Markets”. Childhood. 20(1) 51-65.

Estrada, Emir and Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo. 2013. “Living the Third Shift: Latina Adolescent Street Vendors in Los Angeles.” Immigrant Women Workers in the Neoliberal Age. Urbana, IL, University of Illinois Press edited by Nilda Flores-Gonzalez, Anna Romina Guevarra, Maura Toro-Morn and Grace Chang. University of Illinois Press.

Estrada, Emir and Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo. 2011. “Intersectional Dignities: Latino Immigrant Street Vendor Youth in Los Angeles.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. 40(1) 102–131.

Hondagneu-Sotelo, Pierrette; Emir Estrada; Hernan Ramirez. 2011 “Más allá de la Domesticidad: Un análisis de género de los trabajos inmigrantes del sector informal [Beyond Domesticity: A Gendered Analysis of Immigrant Informal Sector Work]” Papers: Revista de Sociologia, Spain. 96 (3) 805-824.

 

PUBLIC, PROFESSIONAL, & COMMUNITY-ORIENTED PUBLICATIONS

Estrada, Emir. 2016. “Stigmatized Markets: L.A. street vending kids working and restoring a dignified self” Mujeres Talk. Published on June 2. https://library.osu.edu/blogs/mujerestalk/2016/05/31/stigmatized-markets-los-angeles-street-vending-kids-working-and-restoring-a-dignified-self/#comments

 

Estrada, Emir. 2016. “Be Selfish!: The Advice I Never Received and Never Imagined Giving to My Own Latino Students.” The Society Pages: Feminist Reflections. Published on February 18. https://thesocietypages.org/feminist/2016/02/18/be-selfish-the-advice-i-never-received-and-never-imagined-giving-to-my-own-latino-students/

 

MEDIA COVERAGE OF MY WORK

ASU Now: Access, Excellence, Impact:  https://asunow.asu.edu/20160906-global-engagement-asu-anthropologist-examines-immigration-through-eyes-children

Horizonte PBS: http://www.azpbs.org/horizonte/play.php?vidId=9434

EFE Telemundo: http://www.telemundoatlanta.com/1829_nacional/4059015_ninos-vendedores-ambulantes-resultado-de-la-falta-de-oportunidades-de-padres.html

The State Press:  http://www.statepress.com/article/2016/09/spcampus-sociologist-immigration-children

Research Activity

Latina/o Street Vending Children in Los Angeles

In her first research project, Dr. Estrada examines an understudied population, Latino children working in a racialized and gendered informal occupation in Los Angeles—street vending. This research examines the diverse ways in which children (ages 10-18) working with their parents in public and highly visible spaces experience street vending and in turn we come to understand this informal occupation in a more complex manner. Dr. Estrada believes that we can learn a lot about the immigration process through the eyes and experiences of children.  Her research illuminates the immigration experience by focusing on how adults and children together negotiate processes of economic incorporation in the United States.  Her work shows that children are not merely “baggage” that adult immigrants simply bring along. Instead, this research demonstrates that children are also active contributors to family processes and household resources.

 

DACA Travelers: Intergenerational Family Dynamics in a New Era of Immigration

In collaboration with Dr. Alissa Ruth, Dr. Estrada embarked on a second research project on Dreamers in California and Arizona who have temporary rights under the 2012 executive action of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). In the summer of 2016, Estrada’s team interviewed DACA recipients who traveled to Mexico for the first time after their childhood arrival to the U.S. Traveling to Mexico was an intimidating process for Dreamers and for their families because there is no guarantee that they will be allowed to re-enter the U.S. by Customs and Immigration. Moreover, there is much uncertainty about the future of DACA. Thus, while these Dreamers have more rights than ever before, they are still living in a state of limbo. This study also includes interviews with the parents of these DACA travelers and it is designed to provide a nuance understanding of DACA families and not just DACA Dreamers.  This study aims to uncover the decision making process that takes place in the migration experience from a family perspective. DACA Dreamers operate within a family structure and we want to understand the processes by which the decision to travel to Mexico is made at the micro level and how this decision then impacts the entire family unit. 

 

Return Migration

Dr. Estrada’s third research project focuses on return migration. She plans on conducting an ethnographic study with Mexicans who are 65 and older and are retiring from work in the U.S. and deciding to move back to Mexico. This will be a multigenerational study where the children (the second generation) and the grandchildren (third generation) of these returned migrants will also be interviewed. This intergenerational study will help us understand how the decision to return to Mexico is made. Dr. Estrada is interested in seeing how the second and third generation are involved and affected by return migration.

Courses

Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
ASB 484 Internship
ASB 493 Honors Thesis
ASB 499 Individualized Instruction
ASB 580 Practicum
ASB 590 Reading and Conference
ASB 592 Research
ASB 790 Reading and Conference
ASB 792 Research
ASB 799 Dissertation
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Title
AFR 202 Imm & Ethnic Relations in US
ASB 202 Imm & Ethnic Relations in US
ASB 492 Honors Directed Study
ASB 591 Seminar
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Title
ASB 484 Internship
ASB 493 Honors Thesis
ASB 499 Individualized Instruction
ASB 580 Practicum
ASB 590 Reading and Conference
ASB 592 Research
ASB 790 Reading and Conference
ASB 792 Research
ASB 799 Dissertation
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Title
AFR 202 Imm & Ethnic Relations in US
ASB 202 Imm & Ethnic Relations in US
ASB 492 Honors Directed Study
ASB 591 Seminar
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Title
ASB 484 Internship
ASB 493 Honors Thesis
ASB 499 Individualized Instruction
ASB 580 Practicum
ASB 590 Reading and Conference
ASB 592 Research
ASB 790 Reading and Conference
ASB 792 Research
ASB 799 Dissertation
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Title
ASB 202 Imm & Ethnic Relations in US
AFR 202 Imm & Ethnic Relatioions in US

Presentations

2013:     Intergenerational Household Dynamics. International Symposium on Illegality,   Youth and Belonging Conference. Harvard University (October 25-26)

2013:     Changing Household Dynamics. Colloquium Speaker.  ASUs School of Human Evolution and Social Change. (October 11)

2013:     Collectivist Immigrant Bargain: My parents want me to be Something in life, like a lawyer or a hero. UC-Wide Migration Conference. UCLA (Febuary 22)

2013:     Exploitation or Empowerment: Childrens Street Vending Experience in Los Angeles From Prosecution to Empowerment: Fighting Trafficking and Promoting the Rights of Migrants. USC (February 2)

2012:     Cambiando la Din�mica del Hogar: Recursos Americanos y de Generaci�n Entre Ni�os Que Se Dedican al Comercio Ambulante en Los Angeles. Universidad Aut�noma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM) Instituto Profesional de la Regi�n Oriente (IPRO) (November 14)

2012:     Gendered Migrations. Pacific Sociological Association Conference.  San Diego (March 22-25)

2010:     Changing Household Dynamics: Second Generation Latina/o Adolescent Street Vendors in Los Angeles. American Sociological Association, annual meeting. Atlanta (August 16).

2010:      Dude, I was born here!: Children's American Cultural Resources in Street Vending Markets. Contesting the Streets: Street Vending, Open Air Markets, and Public Space.  Sponsored by the UCLA Center for the Study of Urban Poverty and the USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (May 14-15).

2009:     Markets of Shame and Pride: Latino Immigrant Street Vendor Youth in Los Angeles. Law and Society Association annual meeting. Denver, Colorado. (May 28-30).

 2009:      Paradox of Pride and Shame: Latino Adolescent Street Vendors in Los Angeles. Urban Street Vending: Economic Resistance, Integration or Marginalization? Technical University Berlin, Germany. Sponsored by The Institute "Folklore Archive" of the Romanian Academy Cluj-Napoca (May 15-16).

 

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

I see teaching, mentoring and research as integrally intertwined and I am committed to sharing my passion for the study of Mexican and Central American families in my classroom. In my teaching, I use my own research with Latino immigrant youth to better understand the challenges Latino immigrant youth face at school, the home and at work. I pride myself as a fine, compassionate, and enthusiastic instructor. My courses are taught with a strong comparative orientation that focuses on major themes and topics such as working-class experiences, politics and race and gender relations. My teaching philosophy is based upon my belief that learning is a group process.  As a teacher I engage students individually, but I encourage them to confront and debate course topics in groups after which they develop their ideas in larger class discussions. This allows the students to learn from each other and the classroom then becomes a source of social capital and support to all students.  I also believe that my students have the potential to change lives beyond the confines of the university.  For this reason, I bridge the university with local community organizations that help provide a space for my students where they can become agents of change!

Editorships

Dr. Estrada has served as an academic peer reviewer for the following journals:

Association of Mexican American Educators, Inc. (AMAE): http://amaejournal.utsa.edu/index.php/amae

Ethnic and Racial Studies: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rers20

Qualitative Sociology: http://link.springer.com/journal/11133

Social Problems: http://socpro.oxfordjournals.org/

Sociological Perspectives: http://spx.sagepub.com/

Professional Associations

<p>American Sociological Association (ASA) Pacific Sociological Association (PSA) Latin American Studies Association (LASA)</p>

Service

SERVICE TO SHESC AND ASU STUDENTS

 

SHESC Personnel Committee

 

Dissertation Committee Member

Rachel Luchmun, Ph.D. Graduate Student (August 2015 to Present)    

Lisa Reber, Ph.D. Graduate Student (January 2016 to Present)

   

Barrett Honor’s Thesis Advisor

Elinor Johnson, Undergraduate Student (January 2016 to Present)

 

Honor’s Credit Contract

Daniel Loonam, Undergraduate Student (Fall 2016)