Global Health, MA
Accelerated Program

In this program, global health is considered to be much more and very different from international public health. It emphasizes that major health challenges stem from many factors well beyond disease itself – factors that are ecological, cultural, institutional, historical, evolutionary, social and technological. Any effective, sustainable solutions to our most pressing global health challenges will need to take all of these factors into account, including the complex ways in which they relate to each other.

In this manner, this degree understands health as not simply a product of disease, but rather emerging in the contexts of our complex and interrelated ecology, politics, history, culture, social institutions and evolutionary biology. It also places primacy on how to address the broader (structural, cultural) bases of ill-health in complicated, ever-changing health challenges in low-resource community settings and a globalizing world. To do this, the degree combines both social and life science theory with on-the-ground research and its application. There is a strong emphasis on collaborative action as key to identifying and addressing global health problems in a sustainable and meaningful way.

Students accepted into the program are tied to ongoing interdisciplinary global health projects that address complicated, multifaceted health challenges that defy easy fixes (such as reemerging infectious diseases, obesity or climate-change-related disease). Students develop an applied project to contribute to the team goals. By applying a collaborative, problem-solving format, the M.A. in global health is intended to provide those planning to enter health or related (e.g., environmental, social) fields with the interdisciplinary orientation, team-skills and social and cultural acuity that the Pew Health Professional Consortium inter alia has identified as critical but lacking in current health workforce training. The degree also emphasizes experiential learning as a way to gain mastery and requires participation in a global internship program based in one of the international partnering communities.

The MA in global health program requires a total of 30 credit hours. It is entirely possible for students to complete the master’s requirements in one calendar year, but they have the option of completing it in 2 years.

Core Coursework (12 credits)
ASB 510/SSH 510 Health: Social and Biocultural Theories (3); and 
ASB 500: Ethnographic Field Methods (3); and 
ASB 503/SSH 503: Medical Anthropology (3); and 
AML 613: Methods and Concepts in Math Epidemiology (3) OR SSH 591: Principles of Epidemiology for Global Health (3)

Practicum (minimum 6 credits)*
Students are required to complete a minimum of 6 credits of practicum; however, it is possible to take up to 9 credits of practicum and have 3 of the credits count towards the required electives.

ASB 440/SSH: 402 Community Partnerships for Global Health (3-9) 
ASM/SSH 414: Urban and Environmental Health (3) (fall and spring semesters only) 
ASB/SSH 512: Social Science Applications in Community Health (3-9) 
ASB/SSH 580: Practicum (1-9) 
ASB/SSH 583: Fieldwork (1-9) 
ASB/SSH 584: Internship (1-9) 
SSH 584: Instructional Internship (3)

Electives (6 credits)*
ASB 443/SSH 403: Cross-cultural Studies in Global Health (3-6) 
ASB 410/SSH 400: Poverty, Social Justice & Global Health (3) 
ASB 462: Medical Anthropology: Culture & Health (3) 
ASB 440/SSH 402: Community Partnerships for Global Health (3-6) 
ASM/SSH 414: Urban and Environmental Health (3) 
ASB 502: Health of Ethnic Minorities (3) 
ASB/SSH 512: Social Science Applications in Community Health (3-6) 
ASB/SSH 580: Practicum (1-6) 
ASB/SSH 583: Fieldwork (1-6) 
ASB/SSH 584: Internship (1-6) 
ASM 546: Principles of Human Genetics (3) 
ESS 513: Institutions (3) 
ESS/SSH 514: Urban and Environmental Health (3) 
POS/SGS 531: Global Health Governance (3) 
SSH 511: Ethics in Health Social Science Research (3) 
SSH 584: Instructional Internship (3) 
SSH/ASM 514: Infectious Disease and Human Evolution (3) 
WST 710: Women and Health (3)

Applied Project (6 credits)
SSH 593: Applied Project (6)

All students are required to complete 6 credits hours of an applied project in consultation with their faculty advisor. Students must successfully complete one of the following options in order to fulfill this requirement.

Internship/Practicum 
Students can choose to take their applied project hours as part of an approved practicum/internship. The practicum is an intensive, fieldwork opportunity. We encourage students to complete this option as an international field site through our summer global internship/practicum program, but students can also complete this requirement with a local group/organization.

Research Project 
In this option, students take a substantial role in a current faculty-led research project (overseen by approved global health faculty, usually their faculty advisor). Note: This is not an independent, student-led research project. Students interested in carrying out their own research should speak with their faculty advisor about writing a scholarly research paper.

Scholarly Research Paper 
Students who choose this option will write a scholarly research paper between 7,000-10,000 words in consultation with their faculty advisor.

Outreach Project 
Students may choose to carry out an outreach project with a group/organization (locally or internationally) in order to engage individuals and foster community participation in addressing global health issues. Activities can include, but are not limited to, the following: creating educational/informational materials, creating a website, organizing an outreach event, developing a strategic plan or participation in a museum exhibit, to name a few.

* Substitutes to practicum and electives may be permitted by the graduate director, including individualized research/conference/independent study courses with approved faculty. MA students may count up to 6 credits of 400-level coursework towards their degree. Accelerated BA/MA students can only count 3 credits of 400-level coursework towards their master's degree and 6 credits of 500-level coursework towards their BA degree.

This degree is also offered as an accelerated degree with the global health BA program.

The accelerated BA/MA in global health program allows the most talented global health undergraduates to acquire advanced skills in this field.

Students must apply to this program their junior year – admission is competitive. Students work closely with faculty and student peers, gaining supervised practical experience in the application of core skills to the solution of basic global health problems.

This degree is designed to meet the educational needs of professionals seeking careers in global health and can be considered both a terminal degree program for those students planning to enter the workforce at the end of the MA, or a gateway to doctoral studies. This is one of the fastest-growing areas of study nationally, and by participating in the accelerated degree program, students can earn both degrees in 5 years of full-time study.

Students accepted into the accelerated BA/MA program apply 3 credits of 400-level coursework from the BA to the MA, and 6 credits of 500-level coursework from the MA to the BA. This "saves" 9 credit hours of work for the degrees combined.

To be eligible for admission to the accelerated program, a student must:

  • be a declared global health major at the time of application;
  • have accumulated 75 hours toward the BA at the time of application and be on track to have completed 90 hours by fall of the senior year;
  • have a 3.5 GPA in all global health major coursework and an overall 3.5 GPA:
  • have completed at least 12 credits of upper-division (300- and/or 400-level) courses in the global health major with an A- or better grade (at least 6 credits of those must be core required courses) by the time the application is due in December;
  • have completed the required study abroad program; and
  • complete the BA requirements as a May graduate.

Students who do not meet these criteria are still eligible to apply to the MA in global health program and should plan to do so the fall of their senior year.

For those accepted into the accelerated program, below is a general timeline to complete the required coursework. For a more detail description of the required curriculum, see the PDF iconglobal health degree requirements and check out the FAQs tab.

BA Sequence

Students who are accepted into the accelerated program must complete the 3 credits of 400-level coursework and the 6 credits of 500-level coursework after acceptance into the accelerated program and after completion of 90 credit hours of coursework.

Fall – Senior Year:

  • Complete 3 credits of 500-level coursework
  • Complete one 400-level global health course (3 credits)

Spring – Senior Year:

  • Complete 3 credits of 500-level coursework
  • Complete one 400-level global health course (3 credits) (if not completed in fall semester)
  • Apply for BA spring graduation deadline/graduate in May

MA Sequence

Students who are accepted into the accelerated BA/MA program must complete 21 credit hours of 500-level coursework after graduating from the BA in global health. In order to graduate in 1 year, students should follow this timeline once officially starting the master's program:

Fall (9 hours):

  • 6 credits of required core courses (ASB 500 and ASB/SSH 510)
  • 3 credits of electives/practicum (must be 500 level)

Spring (6–12 hours):

  • 6 credits of required core courses (ASB/SSH 503 and AML 613 or SSH 591)
  • Optional: 6 credits of applied project

Graduate in May if 21 hours of approved coursework beyond the bachelor's degree, including 6 hours of applied project, are completed.

Summer (optional if applied project is not completed by spring):

  • 6 credits of applied project (if not completed in previous semester)

Graduate in August if 21 hours of approved coursework beyond the bachelor's degree, including 6 hours of applied project, are completed.

Photo of Megan Jehn

Global Health Program Director
Megan Jehn, Associate Professor
Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability

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John (Marty) Anderies, Professor
Professor & Graduate Director, School of Sustainability
Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability
Associate Director, Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment

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Christopher Boone, Professor
Dean, School of Sustainability
Affiliated Faculty, School of Geographical Science and Urban Planning

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Alexandra Brewis Slade, President's Professor
Co-Director, Mayo Clinic-ASU Obesity Solutions
Distinguished Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine

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Jane Buikstra, Regents' Professor
Founding Director, Center for Bioarchaeological Research

Photo of Carlos Castillo-Chavez

Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Regents' Professor
Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, School of Life Sciences
Director, Simon A. Levin Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center
Distinguished Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability

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Monica Gaughan, Associate Professor

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Kim Hill, Professor
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity
Faculty Affiliate, Institute of Human Origins

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Katie Hinde, Associate Professor
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine

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Daniel Hruschka, Associate Professor
Associate Director
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity

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Ana Hurtado, Professor
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine

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Kelly Knudson, Professor
Director, Center for Bioarchaeological Research

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Jonathan Maupin, Associate Professor

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Gary Schwartz, Associate Professor
Faculty Affiliate, Institute of Human Origins
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine

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Anne Stone, Regents' Professor
Director, Center for Bioarchaeological Research
Associate Director, Center for Evolution and Medicine
Faculty Affiliate, Institute of Human Origins & School of Life Sciences

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Amber Wutich, Professor
Director, Center for Global Health
Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Evolution and Medicine

Photo of Abigail York

Abigail York, Associate Professor
Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability

General information

Q: What is "global health" in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change?
A: To us, global health is much more and very different from public health. We understand that major health challenges stem from many factors well outside of disease – factors that are, among other things, ecological, cultural, institutional, historical, evolutionary, social and technological. Any effective, sustainable solutions to our most pressing global health challenges will need to take all of these factors into account, including the complex ways in which they relate to each other. Ill health in all these contexts is understood as created or exacerbated by power imbalances, poverty and other forms of social exclusion. A commitment to the principles of social justice and of community-centered and community-serving research is evident in everything we do, and is central to how we address health challenges. We also strongly hold that the value of evolutionary and Darwinian perspectives on health expand our capacity to understand and address contemporary health problems, and our degrees include a clear appreciation for how evolutionary biology and the study of long-term history (such as through bioarchaeology) inform health problems and solutions. To do this, we apply cutting-edge methods and theories from the social and life sciences, including anthropology, mathematics, genetics, history, human biology, sociology and geography.

Our school's broader global health initiatives are organized in research teams/clusters that are addressing specific global health problems that defy easy solutions, and master's students are all placed within these clusters as active participants, along with participating faculty and doctoral students. These research efforts are also tied to specific community partnerships our school maintains around the globe. Examples of teams/clusters include reemerging infectious diseases in hunter-gatherer communities; climate change-related disease issues, such as water quality; and the rise of obesity among the very poor.

Q: What can I do with a master's degree in global health? 
A: Nationally and internationally, the health field provides enormous and varied career opportunities, and demand for skilled graduates is already high and increasing rapidly. The degree would support the goals of those who plan to pursue careers in health services, whether in government agencies, NGOs or in private business or industry. The degree is similar to a master's in public health in terms of employment opportunities but provides a slightly different skill set – one more conversant with the challenges of working in vulnerable communities and across cultures. The MA degree also provides real-world experience doing transnational team-based research, which provides a hirable skill set for a range of professions.

Q: What research areas are available for students to work on once admitted to the master's program? 
A: Currently, we have 5 main research clusters:

  • Climate change-related disease
  • Health education and culture change
  • Neglected, reemerging and new infectious diseases
  • Obesity/food insecurity as conditions of poverty
  • Reproductive health

The clusters evolve through time based on community needs, faculty interest and emerging opportunities, so flexibility is required for all participants.

Q: Why do an MA (not an MPH) in global health? 
A: The MA in global health is specifically focused on how to address the broader (structural, cultural) bases of ill health in complicated, ever-changing health challenges in low-resource community settings and a globalizing world. As such, it combines both social and life science theory with on-the-ground training at specified field sites as part of transnational research teams. A number of universities nationally are introducing new master's degrees in the area of global public health. This is an area of rapidly growing student interest, employment and funding opportunities, nationally and globally. Most of these new degrees are taught within a traditional disease-focused public health model, usually within colleges of medicine or public health. This degree is different because it centers on skill sets for addressing global health challenges that are from outside of a traditional public health model (and thus often thoughtfully critical of conventional approaches to complex health problems). The MA capitalizes on ASU's considerable and established strength in the social and life sciences, where there is a very wide range of faculty working on health-related issues, such as in anthropology, global studies, applied mathematics, political science and human biology. It gives students important skills from outside of public health that are especially needed in communities that are socially excluded or otherwise highly vulnerable – such as complex understandings of the roles of history and culture in disease and health solutions, of the power relationships inherent in disease and public health solutions and of the possibilities for using local and cultural knowledge to create sustainable, meaningful health solutions "outside of the box."

Q: Can I advance from the MA to the PhD in global health? 
A: The MA in global health is considered a "terminal" degree. This means students will have to make a separate application to join the PhD program. If they are accepted, however, the 30 credit hours of the MA can be applied toward the PhD degree.

 

Degree requirements

Q: What are the degree requirements for the MA in global health? 
A: The degree requires 30 hours, which include 12 credits of core coursework, a minimum of 6 credits of internship/practicum, 6 credits of electives and 6 credits of applied project. Please see our course requirements page for more specific information.

Q: What is the practicum/internship requirement? 
A: Students must each complete a minimum of 6 hours of research collaboration, internship or practicum. The goal of the practicum experience is for students to have firsthand experience of tackling health issues or questions in the real world. These can take a range of forms (supervised research, service learning, excavation, etc.) and are expected to be in a form that expands the student's skill set (i.e., is something the student does not have much if any prior experience with). These can be completed in the Phoenix or immediate Arizona area. Students can either take these as approved specific courses or sign up with individual faculty.

Q: What is the applied project? 
A: Each master's student must complete a 6-credit-hour applied project towards the end of their program. The applied project can take a wide range of forms, based on student talents and preference. It may be a global practicum/internship, participating heavily in a research project, writing a scholarly research paper or conducting an outreach project. Please see our course requirements page for more information regarding the applied project.

Q: What is the timeline for completing the degree? 
A: We recommend that all MA students complete the program within one full calendar year; however, MA students have the option of completing the degree within two years. Accelerated BA/MA students must complete the MA within one calendar year of their official admission into the master’s program.

Q: How many credit hours need to be completed per semester? 
A: In order to complete the program within 1 year, students need to take between 9 and 12 credits, depending if you are an accelerated BA/MA student or an MA student. Students who wish to graduate within 2 years must take between 6 and 9 credits per semester and/or take summer classes.

Q: What does a suggested course sequence look like for MA students? 
A: While courses can be interchangeable, here is an example of what the MA program might look like if completed in 1 or 2 years: 

MA – Full Time/1 YearMA – Full Time/2 Years
Fall

ASB 500 Ethno Methods (3)

ASB/SSH 510 Health Bio/Soc Theory (3)

500-level practicum course

GH elective (400 or 500 level) (3)

ASB 500 Ethno Methods (3)

ASB/SSH 510 Health Bio/Soc Theory (3)

Optional: 500-level practicum course (3)

Spring

ASB/SSH 503 Med Anth (3)

AML 613 or SSH 591 (3)

500-level practicum course (3)

GH elective (400 or 500 level) (3)

ASB/SSH 503 Med Anth (3)

AML 613 or SSH 591 (3)

Optional: 500-level practicum course (3)

Summer

SSH 593 Applied Project (6)

Graduate in August

SSH 512 Practicum (6)

(if not completed during previous semesters)

Fall

GH elective (400 or 500 level) (3)

GH elective (400 or 500 level) (3)

Spring

SSH 593 Applied Project (6)

Graduate in May

Q: What does a suggested course sequence look like for accelerated BA/MA students? 
A: The BA/MA curriculum is much more prescribed since students must fulfill requirements for their BA as well as their MA. Thus, it is important to plan accordingly and consult with your undergraduate advisor well in advance of applying for the accelerated program. Here is an example of what this might look like:

Fall 
(Senior Year)
500-level practicum course (3) (counts for BA practicum) in process of completing BA requirements
Spring 
(Senior Year)

500-level practicum course (3) (counts for BA elective)

400-level GH course (3)

Complete BA requirements and apply for graduation from BA program.

Fall

Officially start MA program.

ASB 500 Ethno Methods (3)

ASB/SSH 510 Health Bio/Soc Theory (3)

GH Elective (500 level) (3)

Spring

ASB/SSH 503 Med Anth (3)

AML 613 or SSH 591 (3)

Optional: SSH 593 Applied Project (6)

Apply for graduation from MA program.

Summer

SSH 593 Applied Project (6) (if not completed in spring)

Apply for graduation from MA program.

 

Accelerated BA/MA questions

Q: Can I do an accelerated BA/MA in global health? 
A: Outstanding undergraduate students in the global health BA program are encouraged to apply to the accelerated BA/MA degree program. Students accepted into the accelerated BA/MA program apply 3 hours from the BA to the MA, and 6 hours from the MA to the BA. This “saves” 9 credit hours of work for the degrees combined. Students can complete both degree requirements in 5 years. Students must apply for the accelerated program in December of their junior year, so it is important to plan early and speak with your advisor about the correct pathway to be eligible for the accelerated program. Please see the Admissions Questions below for eligibility criteria.

Q: How does the accelerated/accelerated degree work?
A: The undergraduate major consists of a minimum of 39 credit hours, and 30 for the master's. Given 3 credits from the BA count to the MA and 6 hours from the MA count to the BA, the timeline to both degrees is accelerated because students only have to complete 21 graduate credits beyond the BA, which is possible within two semesters of full-time coursework.

Students must maintain a B+ (3.25 GPA) or better average in their remaining bachelor's-level courses to be retained in the MA program, as well as meeting GPA expectations for the MA (B [3.0 GPA] or better in core courses). If they do not complete both degrees within 4 semesters of being admitted, they are deemed as making unsatisfactory progress. Further, ASU requires that undergraduate students who have been accepted into an accelerated bachelor's/master's degree program prior to the awarding of their undergraduate degree must complete all of their bachelor's degree requirements and graduate within 12 months of the first day of the semester for which they were admitted to the accelerated program.

It is also important to understand that undergraduate students enrolled in accelerated BA/MA programs are eligible to enroll in graduate-level courses and seminars. Otherwise, however, students are considered undergraduates until all undergraduate requirements have been met and the bachelor’s degree has been posted to the student’s transcript.

Q: Does my MA applied project count as my BA Honors thesis?
A: No. But if your faculty advisor agrees, you can expand upon an Honors thesis as your applied project.

Q: Does/can my MA applied project count as my BA capstone if I do the accelerated degrees? 
A: Not really. You may be able to begin your applied project in the 3-credit BA capstone course (senior seminar) and finish it as the MA applied project, but you will need to consult with your faculty advisor if you wish to pursue this option.

 

Admissions questions

Q: What is required or desired to be admitted into the stand-alone MA degree? 
A: Our desire is to only accept the very best students who are going to succeed and truly contribute in a high-speed, team-based, research-collaborative environment. We are looking for people who are smart and adaptable and bring good research skills to the table.

Admission decisions are competitive, based on the following:

  • Statement of purpose
  • Undergraduate and graduate cumulative GPA
  • 3 letters of recommendations
  • GRE scores
  • Relevant experience or skills (e.g., research experience, language)
  • Fit to current faculty interests

The minimum requirement is a bachelor's degree or equivalent in the social, life or applied sciences (e.g., anthropology, global studies, global health, political science, women and gender studies, human biology, nutrition) from a regionally accredited institution. At this time, preference is given for students with the BA in global health degree or ASU degree equivalent. Expected minimum GPA for consideration for admission would normally be 3.5 on a 4.0 scale for the last 2 years of study leading to a bachelor's degree.

Factors for admission also include anticipated faculty and course availability. Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to contact the academic success specialist for our graduate programs at shesc.grad@asu.edu prior to submitting an application.

Q: What is required or desired to be admitted into the accelerated BA/MA degree? 
A: To be eligible for admission to the accelerated program, students must:

  • be declared global health majors at the time of application;
  • have accumulated 75 hours toward the BA at the time of application and be on track to have completed 90 hours by the fall of the senior year;
  • have a 3.5 GPA in all global health major coursework and an overall 3.5 GPA;
  • have completed at least 12 credits of upper-division (300- and/or 400-level) courses in the global health major with an A- or better grade (at least 6 credits of those must be core required courses) by the time the application is due in December;
  • have completed the required study abroad program; and
  • complete the BA requirements as May graduates.

Current ASU undergraduates interested in the accelerated degree must apply in the fall of their junior year for admission in the fall of their senior year, and must complete the BA requirements as May graduates. Global health majors who are not eligible to apply for the accelerated program are encouraged to apply to the stand-alone MA program, which is still possible to finish in 1 calendar year beyond the BA degree.

Admission is competitive, based on the following:

  • Statement of purpose GPA (3.5 minimum)
  • A minimum of 2 letters of recommendation (at least one must be from core or affiliated global health faculty specifically addressing the student's readiness for the MA-level work and include a notation of whether that faculty member is willing to supervise the student)
  • Relevant experience or skills (e.g., research experience, language)
  • Fit to current faculty interests Proposed timetable*

No GRE score is required for application to the accelerated program. It is expected students will complete the MA requirements in no more than 2 additional semesters and a summer (if needed) after graduating from the BA and officially beginning the MA program.

*Students must include a timeline/explanation showing how they intend to meet this requirement.

Q: What should my statement of purpose contain?
A: An important part of the application is the statement of purpose because the fit between the candidate and the faculty/research teams with which the student will work is considered an important part of the decision to admit. Students must nominate one of the following research areas they wish to work with (although this may change later with supervisory permission).

  • Climate change-related disease
  • Health education and culture change
  • Neglected, reemerging and new infectious diseases
  • Obesity/food insecurity as conditions of poverty
  • Reproductive health

In addition to identifying a research area, students may wish to identify any global health faculty with whom they wish to work. Students should highlight their relevant experience and skills and why they want to pursue a degree that is in a high-speed, team-based, research-collaborative environment.

The expectation of timely progression through the program is also a criterion for admission, so preference is given to students demonstrating a timeline and funding plan for how they will complete the degree in a timely fashion. As noted, MA students can finish the program within one calendar year (2 semesters and a summer), but it is allowable to finish within 2 years. However, accelerated applicants must finish their MA within 1 calendar year from admission. Thus, it is important that applicants acknowledge their timeline to complete the degree within the statement of purpose.

Q: Can I start the degree in the spring?
A: No. We only accept applicants to begin classes in the MA program in the fall. Applications follow the school's normal timeline, which has applications due mid-December for admission in the following fall. It may be possible to complete some elective/internship/practicum hours in the summer prior to the fall of entry, but check in advance once you have been accepted.

Q: Does the school offer any funding for global health MA students? 
A: No. We have no scholarships or other forms of additional or special support for MA in global health students.

Q: When do I apply? 
A: Deadlines for admission for fall close the prior winter, following the school's deadlines. Usually this is early December (e.g., December 2011 for admission in fall 2012).

 

 

Degree Offered

Global Health, MA
Liberal Arts & Sciences, College of

Location
Tempe

Plan of Study

The Plan of Study is the required curriculum to complete the program.

View Plan of Study